Uninspected Passenger Vessels

There are two classes of Uninspected Passenger Vessels (UPV) defined in 46 CFR Subchapter C, Uninspected Vessels.

  • The 6-pack Uninspected Passenger Vessel

This is the most common class of UPV and is defined as a vessel of less than 100 gross registered tons (about 65 feet) that is carrying six or fewer passengers for hire, not counting the operator or crew. This is the only UPV that can be operated under the authority of the Operator of Uninspected Passenger Vessel (OUPV) endorsement.

An OUPV Inland issues the authority to operate a 6-passenger UPV on all inland waters of the US. Inland waters includes all waters shoreward of the demarcation line (the boundary line between the Inland and the International Rules of the Road) and the waters of Puget Sound, Strait of Juan de Fuca, and SE Alaska; but does not include the waters of the Great Lakes.

An OUPV Near Coastal issues the authority to operate the same vessel on all inland waters of the US and on ocean waters within 100 nautical miles offshore.

  • The 12-pack Uninspected Passenger Vessel

The 12-pack is defined as a UPV greater than 100 gross registered tons carrying 12 or fewer passengers for hire, not counting the operator or crew. The operator of a 12-passenger UPV must hold an endorsement as Master with an appropriate tonnage limitation. Most 12-packs are under 200 tons so they fall under the authority of the Master 200 ton endorsement. The second captain of a 12-pack must hold an endorsement as Mate 200 tons or higher.

As with the OUPV, a Master or Mate Inland includes all inland water of the US, including the waters of Puget Sound, Strait or Juan de Fuca and SE Alaska. A Near Coastal route includes ocean waters within 200 nautical miles offshore.

DD

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About Dennis

Instructor and Director at Columbia Pacific Maritime LLC
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